How I Got My Agent

Dragon book aesthetic

I signed with the first agent I ever queried. It took 8 months. Allow me to start at the beginning. January After spending fall 2019 on revisions, I officially started querying THE FIRE BREATHES–now lovingly nicknamed #dragonbook in case the title changes–at the beginning of January 2020. It was a new year, blossoming with possibilities. I was ready for it … Read More

Top 9 Querying Tips From Twitter’s #WritingCommunity

It’s officially 2020, and I’m back to blogging! Today’s topic was entirely unexpected. After cutting over 16,000 words from THE FIRE BREATHES and doing an absurd amount of line edits, I was finally ready to start querying—armed with existential dread, encouraging critique partners, and a querying group chat of constructive feedback and support along the way. About a week ago, … Read More

THE LAST OF US is a Masterclass in POV

When discussing point of view (POV) in storytelling, we often default to literature. In today’s blog post, I’m here to argue that a video game—Naughty Dog’s since-remastered 2013 release, THE LAST OF US—provides a masterclass in how to leverage POV effectively, regardless of the medium in which you’re writing. Let’s start with the nitty-gritty: What’s POV, anyway? According to Reedsy, … Read More

Character Development in Gaming & Writing

Last week, we looked at how video games develop character backstory, vary worldbuilding and balance action and reaction scenes. That blog post received more views in two days than any of my other posts so far. (Thank you so much to anyone who read and/or shared!) As a result, I couldn’t help but expand the topic into a series about … Read More

3 Writing Lessons Learned from Video Games

If you want to be a writer, the advice goes, then you need to read widely and regularly. That’s true, but I’d argue that there are also lessons to be learned from what’s often dismissed as a shallow pastime: video games. When I’m not writing, editing, or thinking about writing/editing, I often wander back to my trusty PlayStation 4. Very … Read More

Just Start Writing: The Existential Fear of New Ideas

Two weeks ago, I concluded the #NaNoWriMo tips blog series. If you missed it, I discussed outlining plot, designing characters, constructing setting, and achieving your word count goals. Suddenly, I’m faced with countless possibilities for what to cover next; simultaneously, I’m approaching final edits on my YA fantasy debut, THE FIRE BREATHES, and I’ve started outlining the sequel. As a … Read More

5 Tips You Need To Know Before #NaNoWriMo

Friday is the first day of #NaNoWriMo, which means this is the last entry in the National Novel Writing Month blog series of tips & tricks! So far, you’ve learned about outlining plot, character design, and immersive setting. This week, with NaNo lurking just around the corner, I’m sticking to general tips for achieving that sweet, sweet 50,000 word count … Read More

Top 5 Worldbuilding Tips for Conquering #NaNoWriMo

Welcome back to the National Novel Writing Month blog series! In previous entries, you’ve explored the importance of outlining your plot and your characters. There’s only two more Mondays before #NaNoWriMo participants break from the starting line, hotly pursuing the elusive 50,000-word finish line. Now is the time to design your setting—before your daily word count looms over your creativity. … Read More

How to Develop Dynamic Characters for #NaNoWriMo

The “Star Wars” films (and books, and games, and beyond) feature laser swordfights in space. They include creatures that range from reptilian Rodians to (unfortunately) gangly Gungans. But chances are, when you think of the galaxy far, far away, you think of Luke Skywalker, staring hopefully at the twin suns, or Princess Leia, vaulting into the garbage chute instead of … Read More

3 Reasons You Can’t Survive Without an Outline for NaNoWriMo

You’re hours away from October, which means you’re only a month away from National Novel Writing Month. In honor of the annual 30 days of masochism, I’ll be sharing weekly tips here for anyone—especially young writers—who wants to maximize their literary productivity this November. If you’re participating in NaNoWriMo 2019, then first of all, you have my utmost respect as … Read More